Vicky Collins Online

A Blog With Superpowers


Leave a comment

9/11 Ten Years Later

Kyle and the 9/11 Firefighters

Kyle and the 9/11 Firefighters

There are some things I never forget. The day President Kennedy was assassinated. The day the Challenger exploded. Columbine. What I was doing on 9/11/2001. My husband called me and said turn on the television. I got there in time to see the second plane hit the tower. I watched with my hand over my mouth then turned to my little son and said “Kyle, we’re going to war.” All day long I walked around in a daze. That evening I was called by NBC News. Justice correspondent, Pete Williams, had been vacationing in Yellowstone National Park. He could not get back to Washington so he went live from KUSA in Denver. I was his producer. I wasn’t at Ground Zero. I wasn’t among my east coast colleagues. After a couple days Pete finally was able to get home and I returned to my routine and family.

But 9/11 wouldn’t let go of me. I was consumed by the reports and confused by my feelings. I was feeling detached, panicky and somehow responsible. The more I listened to television and radio the more I felt that the United States had somehow brought this upon ourselves. I needed to bear witness to get some perspective. I decided to go to New York and see things for myself. No one I knew would travel with me so I took my son, Kyle, the same one who looked at me confused when I said “we’re going to war.” We arrived in New York City one month to the day after the attacks. My family was incredulous that I would take him there. My husband’s family was furious that I would put him in danger. What kind of mother was I?

I was afraid to get on a plane. I pushed through it. I was afraid of the Muslim cab driver who picked us up from LaGuardia Airport. I pushed through it. He was as shellshocked as everyone else. I was stunned by the incredible compassion of New Yorkers who were so wounded yet so grateful that we had come. Even the homeless thanked us from their street corners for helping New York get back on its feet. Broadway put on its musicals but theatres were empty. The city was edgy. There were anthrax scares. We went to Ground Zero while it was smoldering. The facade was still standing, crews were still combing through the wreckage and the smell of death remained in the air. We read the flyers with faces of the missing. We saw the flowers and makeshift memorials. I was stunned into silence. I finally cried uncontrollably when we went to Grand Central Station and saw the bulletin boards full of pleas from families desperate to locate loved ones. It was all so much to take in.

I wanted Kyle to know what was lost on that day and what we still had. We couldn’t go to the Statue of Liberty so I took him for a ride on the Staten Island Ferry so he could at least get an idea of what this country stands for and why this attack on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the very essence of America, was so traumatic. And the most profound thing happened. On board the ferry were so many firefighters. They were all from out of town. They had come to attend funerals of their fallen brothers because there simply were not enough firefighters left to honor so many who had died. They were riding the ferry from one funeral to another to give their brothers a proper farewell. Kyle stood among them and had his picture taken. Kyle and the heroes. Later when we were in Midtown Manhattan we paused and watched a funeral processions for a fallen policeman. It was so somber. There was so much sadness in the air.

Now ten years later we pause and reflect and watch memorial tributes on all the television networks then on September 12 we will quickly get on with our lives. So much has changed as a result of 9/11 but so much has really stayed the same. I think most people wish it would just go away and we no longer would live with this cloud of vulnerability. The memories are so painful. But of course it won’t leave us and we persevere. It never will go away and we shall always remember the day and what we were doing when we first found out. I will always be grateful for that time I spent with my son in New York in October 2001. It gave me a chance to grieve and such a sense of clarity. The United States did nothing to provoke this. Did nothing to deserve this terrorist attack at the very soul of America. And yes we did go to war. At the moment it seemed so right. So necessary. We’ve had a lot of time to reflect on that too.

Going to New York after 9/11 was life altering for me and one of the most profound teaching moments for my child. A couple years ago I took my other son, Blair, to New York City. It was a much more festive time but we still went to Ground Zero. It’s a construction site now with a memorial to the side. I kept babbling about memories from the trip I took with Kyle. I wanted Blair to feel it too. We went to the little church next door that withstood the blast and is a memorial to this day. A choir was singing in memory of the fallen, all those years later. There were touching memorials to the New Yorkers and first responders who died. And we went to the Statue of Liberty so he would know what was lost and what this country still stands for to Americans and the world.

For more information on Vicky Collins visit Teletrends Television Production and Development.

To see more photographs visit Vicky Collins Photography.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

War and Remembrance 6

My conversation between Ben Coker, Jr. is getting more interesting as we dig deeper into issues. We come from very different points of view but we’re finding common ground.

Hi Ben,

I hope you and your family are doing well. Sorry it took me a while to get back to you. I have been quite busy and wanted to give your note adequate thought. Your really impress me with your knowledge of history. Many of my beliefs are from the gut. As I read through your letter I notice we agree in degree on many points. But why must people destroy just so they can turn around and rebuild? It seems there have been times in recent memory where change came about without us devastating the infrastructure and crushing the people. The Berlin Wall came down without America rushing in. We are not sending troops to Israel or Palestine to settle differences there. We didn’t go into South Africa to end apartheid. We stayed calm when North Korea rattled its sabers. Just because there is a rogue leader or nation doesn’t mean soldiers need to march in and annihilate people and communities to influence and protect our interests. There are diplomatic solutions to tyrants and bad behavior. It may take more time but I believe it is time well spent. People may think by exercising patience we allow the extremists to organize or worse yet, kill those fighting for peace like Ahmad Shah Massoud, Yitzak Rabin and Benazir Bhutto. Perhaps, but I think America must be careful in the world and not shove our values down other throats. Granted some things like 9-11 and Pearl Harbor require swift and strong intervention, but war must be thought through. The world would be a better place if we didn’t beat our adversaries into submission. Wars are difficult to win.

I believe most people around the globe are good and want peace. I think we really need to be careful not to lump people together. I get very frustrated with people who assume all Muslims are bad because they refuse to distinguish an extremist from a woman who wears a headscarf. I am not defending behavior that threatens Americans. I loathe the terrorists and those who would do us harm. But I wonder how many people who denounce Muslims actually know one personally. I wonder how many people who think Muslims aren’t raging enough against the Taliban, Al Qaeda and other extremists, have actually asked them what they think. I believe that most Muslims cringe over the behavior of the radicals even if they mind their own business. I agree with you that it would be wise for more moderate, peace loving Muslims to verbally condemn radical behavior, but I think people need to walk in their shoes before passing judgment. If I recall you did not speak out during Vietnam because of respect for your parents. Is it surprising that others hold their tongues instead of risk their reputation or draw unwanted attention to themselves and their family?

And on this next point you will probably want to throttle me. I agree with you that building a Mosque a couple of blocks away from Ground Zero is insensitive. But that said, is it inconceivable that a mosque could be used to build awareness, peace and understanding. Just because there is a mosque does that mean it is radicalizing people? It is a place of worship and a community center and from what I understand it is meant to bring people together in peace. We are a country that defends freedom of religion, yet people are trying to take that away. Isn’t that what we are fighting for? Our freedom? Our rights? I think people are getting kind of hysterical. It isn’t just at Ground Zero. Folks don’t want a mosque in Tennessee. They create laws so we don’t have Sharia Law in Oklahoma. America has always been this great melting pot but now people are getting extremely xenophobic. When did we get so afraid of everyone? I agree the media is whipping people into a frenzy. Looking forward to that discussion too. Hope you and your family are anticipating a wonderful Thanksgiving flush with gratitude. Looking forward to hearing from you. Best, Vicky

For more information on Vicky Collins visit http://teletrendstv.com.


2 Comments

Remembering 9/11

Kyle and the 9/11 Firefighters

Kyle and the 9/11 Firefighters

There are some things I never forget.  The day President Kennedy was assassinated.  The day the Challenger exploded.  Columbine.  What I was doing on 9/11/2001.  My husband called me and said turn on the TV.  I got there in time to see the second plane hit the tower.  I watched with my hand over my mouth then turned to my little son and said “Kyle, we’re going to war.”  All day long I walked around in a daze.  That evening I was called by NBC News.  Justice correspondent, Pete Williams, had been vacationing in Yellowstone National Park.  He could not get back to Washington so he needed to go live from KUSA in Denver.  I was his producer.  I wasn’t at Ground Zero.  I wasn’t among my New York colleagues.  Pete went home and so did I. 

But 9/11 wouldn’t let go of me.  I was consumed by the reports and confused by my feelings.  I was feeling detached, panicky and somehow responsible.  The more I listened to TV and radio the more I felt that the United States had somehow brought this upon ourselves.  I needed to bear witness to get some perspective.  I decided to go to New York and see things for myself.  No one I knew would travel with me so I took my little son, Kyle, the same one who looked at me confused when I said “we’re going to war.”   We arrived in New York City one month to the day after the attacks.  My family was incredulous that I would take him there.  My husband’s family was furious that I would put him in danger.  What kind of mother was I?

I was afraid to get on a plane.  I pushed through it.  I was afraid of the Muslim cab driver who picked us up from LaGuardia Airport.  I pushed through it.  He was as shellshocked as everyone else.  I was stunned by the incredible compassion of New Yorkers who were so wounded yet so grateful that we had come.    Even the homeless thanked us from their street corners.  Broadway put on its musicals but theatres were empty.  The city was edgy.  There were anthrax scares.  We went to Ground Zero while it was smoldering.  The facade was still standing, crews were still combing through the wreckage and the smell of death remained in the air.  We read the flyers with faces of the missing.  We saw the flowers and makeshift memorials.  I was stunned into silence.  I finally cried uncontrollably when we went to Grand Central Station and saw the bulletin boards full of  pleas from families desperate to locate loved ones.  It was all so much to take in. 

I wanted Kyle to know what was lost on that day and what we still had.  We couldn’t go to the Statue of Liberty so I took him for a ride on the Staten Island Ferry so he could at least get an idea of what this country stands for and why this attack on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, the very essence of America, was so traumatic.  And the most profound thing happened.  On board the ferry were so many firefighters.  They were all from out of town.  They had come to attend funerals of their fallen brothers because there simply were not enough firefighters left to honor so many who had died.  They were riding the ferry from one to another to give their brothers a proper farewell.  Kyle stood among them and had his picture taken.  Kyle and the heroes.  Later when we were in Midtown Manhattan we paused and watched a funeral processions for a fallen policeman.  It was so somber.  There was so much sadness in the air. 

Now eight years later we pause and reflect and name the dead but then we quickly get on with our lives.  So much has changed as a result of 9/11 but so much has really stayed the same.  I think most people wish it would just go away.  The memories are so painful.  But of course it won’t leave us.  It never will go away and we shall always remember the day and what we were doing when we first found out.  I will always be grateful for that time I spent with my son in New York in October 2001.  It gave me a chance to grieve and such a sense of clarity.  The United States did nothing to provoke this.  Did nothing to deserve this terrorist attack at the very soul of America.  And yes we did go to war.  At the moment it seemed so right.  So necessary. 

Going to New York after 9/11 was life altering for me and one of the most profound teaching moments for my child.  This summer I took my other son, Blair, to New York City.  It was a much more festive time but we still went to Ground Zero.  It’s a construction site now with a memorial to the side.  I kept babbling about memories from the trip I took with Kyle.  I wanted Blair to feel it too.  We went to the little church next door that withstood the blast and is a memorial to this day.  A choir was singing in memory of the fallen.  There were touching memorials to the New Yorkers and first responders who died.  And we went to the Statue of Liberty so he would know what was lost and what this country still stands for to Americans and the world.

For more information on Vicky Collins visit http://teletrendstv.com